Made in the Middle 2018

Made in the Middle | Rugby Art Gallery | January 20March 7

Made in the Middle opens at its final destination at Rugby Art Gallery on 20th January 2018.  it will be the last opportunity to see RE:Animate as part of this touring show.

Made in the Middle, a recurring touring exhibition originated by Craftspace, is the Midland’s principal selling exhibition of high quality contemporary craft and applied art. Selected by an expert panel through open entry, it promotes the best of contemporary craft from makers living and working in the Midlands or with a strong regional connection. It is popular with audiences, galleries and collectors. Besides achieving sales, many makers gain from further commissions, exhibiting and participatory workshop opportunities.

More information here.

FLUX – The Symposium

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FLUX – The Symposium
Centrala Gallery
10th June 2017 5pm-9pm
In response to the challenges that artists, curators, and galleries face today, Room7 are excited to present an evening of talks and discussions on the contemporary arts of the West Midlands. During the symposium we will examine wider topics such as the relevance of contemporary art in society,

and a consideration of the status of contemporary art and artists post ‘Brexit.’
The programme includes talks by Director of New Art West Midlands Craig Ashley and Kim McAleese, Programme Director at Grand Union, a practice workshop where the audience are encouraged to respond to the artworks on display, and a roundtable conversation with the four artists featured in the show, FLUX, James Lomax, Zoe Robertson, Intervention Architecture, and Mark Houghton.

Tea, coffee and a glass of wine is included in the entrance fee, light refreshments will also be available

Tickets £5/, £3 concessions.

Tickets must be pre-booked as numbers are limited.

Tickets can be ordered via ‘Eventbrite,’
https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/flux-symposium-tickets-34504288255?aff=efbneb

There may be limited tickets available on the day, please contact room7curating@gmail.com with any enquiries.

Room7 Symposium Programme:

5:00pm – Welcome
5:15pm – Drawing workshop in Gallery
5:50pm – Coffee Break
6:00pm – ‘The Contemporary Art Scene Post Brexit’ – a conversation with Cheryl Jones (Grand Union) and Craig Ashley (New Art West Midlands)
6:45pm – Break
7:15pm – Exhibition Tour, led by curators and artists
7:30pm – Artist in Conversation: An open-panel with Intervention Architecture, James Lomax, Mark Houghton, and Zoe Robertson.
8:00pm – Drinks
9:00pm – Close

Location: Centrala, Unit 4 Minerva Works, 158 Fazeley Street, B5 5RT.
Organiser: Room7,
Enquiries: Contact Room7 at room7curating@gmail.com

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FLUX

FLUX - Room 7 curating

ROOM7 PRESENTS THEIR FIRST EXHIBITION IN COLLABORATION WITH GRAND UNION AND CENTRALA ART GALLERIES, OPENING FRIDAY 2 JUNE

  • 4 CONTEMPORARY ARTISTS FROM DIFFERENT BACKGROUNDS
  • AN EXHIBITION OF NEW ARTWORKS REPRESENTING ARTISTS FROM THE WEST MIDLANDS
  • ONE-OFF PERFORMANCE WITH MUSIC AND DANCERS WILL TAKE PLACE ON OPENING NIGHT, 2 JUNE

Newly formed collective of curators ROOM7 presents ‘FLUX’, an exhibition of contemporary art in collaboration with Grand Union and Centrala Art Galleries. The collective is made up of 7 curators from different backgrounds brought together by their studies at the University of Birmingham.

The exhibition is formed by the work of four carefully selected artists based in the West Midlands; Mark Houghton, James Lomax, Anna Parker and Zoe Robertson.

All of the artists have made new artwork for the show, responding to the gallery space and its architecture.

Mark Houghton is exhibiting new artworks of monumental size, as well as existing works which combine sculpture and painting in reaction to the space of the gallery.

Artist James Lomax has created ‘site-reactive’ sculptures which extend from floor to ceiling, in reaction to the architecture and the history of the gallery space.

‘Intervention Architecture’ has created an installation space that can be entered by visitors. It will be blacked-out, and they invite the viewer to experience and explore various domestic objects through touch.

Jeweller Zoe Robertson has created a piece of work that can be touched, worn and interacted with. For the opening night she has invited two dance artists, Natalie Garrett Brown and Polly Hudson, and Sellotape Cinema (Stephen Snell and Steven Chamberlain) to deliver an improvised, site-specific and collaborative performance with the artworks.

The exhibition will launch on Digbeth First Friday, a micro art festival in Digbeth, on Friday 2 June at 6pm.

Opening night performance by Zoe Robertson: 2 June 2016

Friday 2 June to 10 June 2017

FREE ENTRY

Centrala Art Gallery: Art Loft

Unit 4 Minerva Works

158 Fazeley Street

B5 5RT Birmingham

 

 About ROOM7

ROOM7 is a curatorial collective; 7 curators from different backgrounds brought together by their studies at the University of Birmingham. With a focus on multidisciplinary practices, they work to explore the limits of the gallery space, and the boundaries between different art disciplines. They promote and support artists in the production of new work, as they develop their practice. www.room7curating.wixsite.com

For more information please visit

www.centrala-space.org.uk

www.grand-union.org.uk

www.digbethfirstfriday.com

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flockOmania 4

flockOmania 4 created by jewellery artist Zoe Robertson

‘flockOmania’, an exhibition blurring the lines between jewellery and performance and will be on show at The Cass Bank Gallery, Sir John Cass School of Art, Architecture and Design, London Metropolitan University

 9-26 January 2017

The Cass, London Metropolitan University presents ‘FlockOmania’, an exhibition created by jewellery artist and Cass alumna Zoe Robertson, on show at the Cass Bank Gallery from 9 to 26 January 2017.

‘FlockOmania’ showcases wearable objects that explore the interrelationship between jewellery and performance, blurring the lines between these two apparently unrelated worlds, and involving sound, film, dance and photography in the process.

Fifteen sculptural jewellery objects meticulously handmade using a mix of traditional craft skills, in combination with industrial processes and new technology, will be on display, creating an unusual setting for a performance-based exploration between objects, the body and the space.

flockOmania 2 by Zoe Robertson jewellery artist image credit Christian Kipp with Natalie Garrett Brown and Amy Voris at Parkside Gallery

 

Robertson created ‘FlockOmania’ in response to a collaborative relationship with dance artists Dr Natalie Garrett Brown and Amy Voris. Their background in contemporary dance, movement improvisation and site based performance provided the catalyst for this body of work. The result is theatrically-sized jewellery that emphasises and explores themes relating to the scale and movement of the body. Originally conceived as a solo exhibition in 2015, the exhibition has grown beyond the original concept, evolving into many different forms: an exhibition, installation, mobile performance and into performance lab workshops.

‘FlockOmania’ challenges the traditional display and use of jewellery. The objects break away from static display and are used to create a space referred to by Robertson, Garrett Brown and Voris as ‘a laboratory of making’. In this space dance artists improvise movement and encourage audience participation.

During the exhibition at The Cass, there will be two afternoon dance interventions on 13 and 18 January and a  private view finale on 20 January).

“I’m delighted to be invited to exhibit flockOmania at The Cass, 20 years after my graduation. Reflecting back on my life as a student I realise that the opportunity to development fundamental skills such as design via making, challenging ideas, experimenting and problem-solving have been an essential grounding to help me establish a successful and enjoyable career as a jewellery artist”

flockOmania 2 by Zoe Robertson jewellery artist with Amy Voris at Parkside Gallery

Where

‘FlockOmania’ comes to the Sir John Cass School of Art, Architecture and Design, London Metropolitan University

The Cass Bank Gallery, Central House, 59-63 Whitechapel High Street, London, E1 7PF

Nearest tube: Aldgate East

When

9-26 January 2017, Monday to Saturday 11am – 5pm

Performance dates: Fri 13 January 2-5pm and Wed 18 January 2-5pm

Private view finale: Fri 20 Jan 6-8pm

If you would like to come watch the performances you need to book your ticket HERE

About

About Zoe Robertson

After graduating from The Cass in 1997 with a BA in Silversmithing, Jewellery and Allied Crafts, Robertson has had a successful career as a jewellery artist. She has exhibited her work internationally and runs a studio ‘The Dual Works’. For the last 10 years she has lectured at the School of Jewellery, Birmingham City University and for the last five has been the course director for Jewellery Design and Related Products

About The Cass

The Cass is the Sir John Cass School of Art, Architecture and Design, London Metropolitan University. It is one of six schools within the University. The Cass teaches about 2000 students at Foundation, Degree and Postgraduate level at two buildings in Aldgate. Subjects include Architecture, Creative Writing, Design Studio Practice, Fine Art, Fashion, Furniture, Graphics, Illustration, Interior Design, Jewellery, Painting, Publishing Photography Photjournalism, Textiles, Theatre and Performance Practice. In 2017 The Cass will launch a new BA Theatre and Film Production Design course, building on the University’s reputation and expertise in both design and performance arts.

The School also offers 200 short and professional development courses. There is a strong emphasis across the studios on socially engaged Architecture, Art and Design applied to both local and global contexts, a Faculty-wide interest in making and many projects focus on aspects of London. Students at The Cass are encouraged to learn through practice, experiment with process and gain real-world experience in both individual and collaborative projects, engaging with professionals, communities and companies.

Links

Find out more:

flockomania.com/

londonmet.ac.uk/faculties/the-cass

Watch FlockOmania in action

Print

Made in the Middle

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Made in the Middle

Contemporary Craft from the Midlands. A Craftspace touring exhibition 2016-2018

Craftspace present a wealth of talented makers from across the Midlands. On the 2nd December 2016, Craftspace’s contemporary craft exhibition Made in the Middle, opens at the Herbert Art Gallery and Museum in Coventry. Made in the Middle is a recurring touring exhibition of high quality contemporary craft and applied art from the Midlands. The eighth in the series, the exhibition provides a great opportunity to purchase and commission work from some of the best makers in the region. This exhibition is developed in partnership with Herbert and is part of Craftspace’s 30th anniversary programme.

Featuring both recent graduates and makers with established reputations, there is a wealth of creativity on display, including ceramics, jewellery, metalwork and textiles. Selected by an expert panel through open entry, it promotes the best of contemporary craft from makers living and working in the Midlands or with a strong recent regional connection. 28 makers have been selected by a panel of curators and craft sector specialists. The makers offer an insight into the skill, creativity and innovative practice within the region.

 

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‘Craft is a vital source of revenue and innovation to the UK, ‘Craft generates £3.4 billion for the UK economy…150,000 people are employed in businesses driven by craft skills.’ (Crafts Council 2014). With recent changes to country’s economy we are keen to highlight and explore the value of craft both in economic terms and social contribution. Through the work and careers of the selected makers, the exhibition will explore enterprise – making as a business – through life of the sole trader . We will also build on the development of digital practices since the last exhibition.’ Emma Daker, Exhibitions and Projects Development Manager, Craftspace.

 

The exhibition will continue its tour to major galleries across the Midlands into 2018 raising the profile of regional makers and giving them the opportunity to sell their work to regional and national collectors. Visitors are encouraged to consider commissioning new work from local makers and a range of more affordable work will be available to buy, whether your budget is a few pounds or a thousand pounds.
Made in the Middle is a partnership between Craftspace and the Herbert Art Gallery & Museum in collaboration with The National Centre for Craft & Design.

 

 

Exhibition dates and events:

The Herbert Art Gallery and Museum: 2 December 2016 – 19 February 2017
Launch event: Thursday 1 December, 6.30- 8.30pm
Parkside Gallery, Birmingham City University: 6 March – 29 April 2017
The National Centre for Craft & Design: 13 May – 8 July 2017
Rugby Art Gallery & Museum: 10 Feb – 7 April 2018

The Herbert Art Gallery and Museum, Jordan Well, Coventry CV1 5QP. Monday – Saturday: 10.00am – 4.00 Sunday: 12.00pm – 4.00pm

Craftspace - Made in the middle featuring work by jewellery artist Zoe Robertson

Herbert Art Gallery and Museum - Craftspace - Made in the middle featuring work by jewellery artist Zoe Robertson

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In the loupe

Subscribe Series -  Zoe Robertson - image credit Image courtesy MARKmagazine.tv Photographer Justin Ridler

 image by MARKmagazine.tv Photographer Justin Ridler

I’m delighted that my Subscribe series is on show at Victoria Sewart Contemporary Jewellery Gallery and in conjunction with Plymouth Art Weekender

Celebrating the director’s Victoria Sewart’s educational routes in contemporary jewellery ‘in the loupe’ brings together a vibrant collection of work created by artists, educators, researchers, and practitioners from The School of Jewellery, Birmingham City University and Plymouth College of Art and Design.

This eclectic mix of work on show spans the breadth of the jewellery discipline from commercial to contemporary, to handcrafted and digital technologies. These talented jewellers like to experiment with a variety of concepts, materials and processes and this exhibition showcases the diversity of this subject area.  They are united by their curiosity for experimentation which builds knowledge and expertise within a particular specialism. It’s this variety of individual directions which underpin the educational experience for students at both institutions which ultimately drives the field forward and feeds the innovation seen in our gallery today.

Each jeweller has an established their own unique voice and the eclectic mix of work on show ranges from hyper decorative excessive ornamentation of intricate details, to bold vibrant and colourful forms. Concepts that transform thoughts and feelings, to jewellery that shocks, jewellery that is interactive and invites playful encounter, to those experimenting with material alchemy, reinventing materials and exploring cutting edge digital technologies. All of which gives you a glimpse at what’s ‘in the loupe’

Exhibitors are Claire Price, Jo Pond, Anna Lorenz, Bridie Lander, Toni Mayner, Sally Collins, Dauvit Alexander, Rachael Colley, Andrew Howard, Sian Hindle, Beaulagh Brooks, Kate Thorley, Zoe Robertson, Maria Whetman, Fern Robinson, Sybella Buttress

 

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In the loupe is on show at

Victoria Sewart Contemporary Jewellery Gallery & School,39 Southside Street, The Barbican, Plymouth PL1 2LE

In the loupe then travels to the School of Jewellery in November 2016

Private view Saturday 24th September 6-8pm  On until 23rd October 2016

a shrine to women’s work

A shrine to womens work - awol studios -Amy Voris - Zoe Robertson

accumulations-logo

I’m delighted to announce i have been invited to create a new piece of work for ‘a shrine to women’s work’ as part of the Accumulations research and development project showing at the Awol studio 1 – 13th August 2016

The information below is from the Accumulations website

Accumulations is a research and development project led by four North West based artists: Dani Abulhawa, Hannah Buckley, Sarah Spies and Amy Voris. Our overall aims are as follows:

  1. to develop a deeper understanding of female activists, artists and theorists who have influenced our creative practices
  2. To explore the lives and experiences of ordinary women and their contribution to the cultural landscape of Manchester
  3. To explore the personal significance of each of our own grandmothers, mothers and sisters to our lives
  4. To find methods of incorporating these findings and experiences into each of our creative practices

In order to explore these aims, we have identified four broad themes that relate directly to each of our respective artistic practices – these are, ‘gendered spaces’, ‘women’s work’, ‘archival practices’ and ‘intergenerational exchange’. We have been working to set up links with several community organisations that connect with these four themes, including the The Whitworth Art Gallery, The Pankhurst Centre, The Sacred Sounds Women’s Choir and The Working Class Movement Library.

Over the course of a year we plan to engage in activities that will allow us to explore the above aims and themes, this will include the following main activities:

  • Independent and group research using museum, library and gallery collections
  • Engaging with women’s groups in the city
  • The creation of four events (in each community organisation)
  • An evaluation day inviting everyone involved in the project

This information is from the Accumulations website

a shrine to women’s work

Amy Voris writes;

My part in the Accumulations project revolves around the subject of women’s work.

There are several strands to my research:

1 Contemplating the everyday working / playing lives of my own and others’ great-grandmothers, grandmothers and mother

2 Contextualizing my own creative work / play in light of the work of my artistic / vocational great-grandmothers, grandmothers and mothers

3 Researching into the history of women’s work in general and in Manchester in particular

women’s work

The subject of women’s work arose out of my lifelong awareness of how my life (and work) contrasts and is in conversation with the lives (and work) of my deceased grandmothers: Violet ‘Sini Wuokku’ [Kahila] Prah, Kathleen Charlotte ‘Kay’ [Clodfelter] Voris, Great Aunty Maxine ‘Max’ [Clodfelter] Callender and adopted grandma Elizabeth ‘May’ [Morley] Poulton.

As well as working as mothers and housekeepers, both of my familial grandmothers worked as secretaries. They administered the working lives of men while also taking care of children and housework. Although I think they enjoyed some aspects of their working lives, they both harbored dreams of having an alternative life as a single, ‘career woman’ and looked on the privileges of my life (with access to education, vocational choice and travel) with encouragement and with a certain amount of envy. They both were excellent typists and wrote letters and then emails to me late into their lives.

I am awe struck by the privileges of my life in comparison with my grandmothers’ lives – most particularly in relation to the work I am able to choose to do. As I move toward middle age, I feel my grandmothers’ presence intensify in my life. I have imaginary conversations with them, sometimes asking for advice, sometimes listening to their tough and awkward questions and sometimes just sharing a moment of appreciation for something beautiful or difficult. In my body I am holding a tension between past and present. I believe that this tension is a major resource for the dances that I make.

creative outcomes

As part of this research and development phase of Accumulations, I am going to have conversations with friends and collaborators about their own working lives with particular attention to the working lives of their familial and vocational mothers, grandmothers and great-grandmothers. These folks will then be invited to make a contribution to a shrine to women’s work. The idea is that this contribution (somehow) takes its inspiration from this lineage of women’s work while also (somehow) being engaged one’s own current work or creative interests. I imagine each person’s contribution will be quite different in terms of its content and mode of presentation. In late July 2016, this shrine will be assembled at a studio space in Hope Mill – itself a site where women laboured in the textile industry in the 19th Century. The shrine will be open to the public between 1 – 13 August.

For more information visit a shrineto womens work

This exhibition is on

1 – 13 August 2016 at Studio 307

AWOL studios creative space and gallery

Hope Mill, 113 Pollard Street, Ancoats, Manchester M4 7JA

Visit AWOL for more information

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#MTFBerlin – Funkhaus 27-30 May 2016

 

Music Tech Fest MTFBerlin flockOmania Zoe Robertson

#MTFBerlin – Funkhaus 27-30 May 2016

flockOmania has been invited to perform at the incredible international Music Tech Fest in Berlin at the end of May. See the announcement HERE

“This year’s festival theme is Transhumanism and Music as Extension of the Human Body. It’s about pushing at the boundaries of what technology can do to transcend all supposed limitations and take human creative intelligence to new planes.”

“In the last week of May 2016, the legendary Funkhaus turns into a giant creative laboratory – a labyrinth of rooms and corridors filled with curious experiments that fuse musical performance and cutting edge technologies. Artists you know well (as well as some you should – and will very soon) team up with the scientists, makers, hackers, designers, creative developers and genius inventors to create strange machines, amazing mixtures, incredible experiences and transhuman wonders. With experiments in mindreading controllers, interactive performances, microbiology synthesisers, bionic extensions and junkyard robotics – the laboratory of #MTFBerlin is a place to explore, discover, and get involved”

‘Music as Extension of the Human Body’

“Between the 23rd and the 27th of May 2016, Zoe will join a group of specially invited artists, makers, designers and inventors to explore interactive performance and ‘Music as Extension of the Human Body’ in a secret chamber of the legendary Funkhaus. Results of this collaboration will be accessible by hackers on Friday 27th and audiences on Saturday 28th of May, during #MTFBerlin”

“Music Tech Fest is a platform that not only brings together artists and developers, but also some of the greatest academic minds working at the intersection of music and technology from across a wide range of disciplines. The MTF ‘Afterparty’ is an academic symposium that takes place on the Monday following the festival weekend – the fourth day of a three-day festival. The purpose of the symposium is to reflect on the ideas that come out of the festival, to share cutting edge research across disciplines, to further the study of music technologies and to initiate collaborative research projects”

For more information and to book tickets visit

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